Ruptly signs deal with Russia’s Krasnogorsk Archive

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Ruptly, the global video news agency, has announced the signing of a deal with Russia’s Krasnogorsk Archive to bring a selection of vital and illuminating video materials to the world’s markets via its platform.

Krasnogorsk, a Russian state archive and one of the largest audio-visual archives in the world, is home to an extensive film collection spanning the history of filmmaking in Russia. As part of a project titled 100 Key Events in Russia in the 20th and 21st Centuries, Ruptly’s video news clients around the world will gain access to this rare video footage.

Under the agreement, Ruptly’s clients will be able to use extraordinary footage from historic events, including:

  • The early days of Soviet space exploration: Belka, Strelka, Gagarin, and the space race.
  • The fascinating story of Robert Robinson, a Jamaican born toolmaker from US auto industry, recruited to work in the USSR and ended up living there for 50 years (1935)
  • Turning points and significant events from the Second World War, such as the Siege of Leningrad 1941- 1944, Kursk battle 1943, the Tehran Conference 1943, as well as rare shots from the Yalta Conference 1945, the victory flag over Berlin 1945, and Victory Day Parade in Red Square 1945.
  • Nikita Khrushchev and John F. Kennedy meeting in Vienna, 1961
  • Young Gorbachev, his rise to power, Perestroika, Glasnost, meeting with HRH Queen Elizabeth II and President Ronald Reagan, and his resignation.
  • Soviet troops withdrawing from Afghanistan, 1989.
  • Yeltsin in Moscow, during the August 1991 coup attempt.
  • Tanks at the white house and barricades in Moscow, Autumn 1993.
  • Andrei Sakharov, scientist, dissident, Nobel laureate.
  • Russian Presidential Elections, 2000.

Matt Tabaccos, CCO at Ruptly, comments: “This partnership, with a major Russian state archive, allows us to give news clients across the world access to rare footage offering new perspectives on momentous events. By developing and expanding our Archive portfolio, we make our entire video news offering even more attractive.”

Director of the Russian State Documentary Film and Photograph Archive, Natalia Aleksandrovna Kalantarova comments: “Making audio-visual documents from our collection available to a wide audience will, I hope, shed light on certain pages of our history and help people gain a more accurate understanding of these significant events.”


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